imagination & creativity

October 29, 2008

I’m teaching a session on God’s design — as it relates to imagination & creativity — this week.  My preparatory study has been exhilerating.  (More in a future post?)

I’ve stumbled upon a new on-line acquaintance (I hope to make friend): Gregory Wolfe.  (Have you met him already?)  Mr. Wolfe is saying some things I think Jesus’ followers need desperately to hear.

I was indicted by his article Art, Faith, & Stewardship of Culture with [his] reference to “unwitting disciples of Karl Marx” and delighted by his article In God’s Image: Do Good People Make Good Art and the correlative concept that creativity is a constant invitation to virtue.  (Of course, both of these bits need badly the thoughtful and nuanced context provided with their respective articles in full-length.)

It’s so encouraging that some fellow sojourners are using their creative gifts to engage with our wide-world … in many of its dimensions.

It’s a mecca for cheap tea, spices, & curry!  For just a moment or two, I felt like I was back in Chicago; it was blissful to feel a little different than the people around me – even if only for a few minutes.

I’m SO excited about the groceries I purchased; here’s a sneak peek at the fruit-dressing I made up for a luncheon I’m co-hosting tomorrow.  (The limes at “Oriental Super Market” were so fresh & cheap; I bought 14.)  Imagine this, drizzled over mangos, bananas, melons, strawberries, & grapes.)  Yummy …

Grated zest and juice of 6 limes (about 2/3 cups)
3 tablespoons honey (or to taste)
1/2 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch of sea salt

Legalize Neighborhoods Again! (Anybody else ready to start a campaign?!)

tonight’s unchristian lecture

September 23, 2008

Tonite, I attended a lecture at Church of the Resurrection on unChristian, a book written by David Kinnamon & Gabe Lyons helping to explain why people – as a rule of thumb – dislike or distrust Christians.  It was quite interesting.  The top six critiquescccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc
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[After Jt roused herself from sleep in the key of c, she determined it might be best for the blog post to find completion on another day.]

The truth of Christianity is not like the universal truths of reason.  The cradle of Christian faith is a story rather than a system.  Though the Bible includes many literary genres, what holds it together is a narrative unity: the story of what God is doing in the world through Israel, through Jesus Christ, through the church.

Kevin Vanhoozer, “Pilgrim’s Digress:Christian Thinking on and about the Post/Modern Way” from Christianity and the Postmodern Turn

Robyn Okrant is living Oprah.  (Wow.)

how cool is this place?

March 26, 2008

Browsing through some old trip pics; loving Venice all over again …

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